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Author Saunders, M.J.; Wingfield, T.; Tovar, M.A.; Baldwin, M.R.; Datta, S.; Zevallos, K.; Montoya, R.; Valencia, T.R.; Friedland, J.S.; Moulton, L.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Evans, C.A.
Title A score to predict and stratify risk of tuberculosis in adult contacts of tuberculosis index cases: a prospective derivation and external validation cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Lancet. Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal Lancet Infect Dis
Volume (up) 17 Issue 11 Pages 1190-1199
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Contacts of tuberculosis index cases are at increased risk of developing tuberculosis. Screening, preventive therapy, and surveillance for tuberculosis are underused interventions in contacts, particularly adults. We developed a score to predict risk of tuberculosis in adult contacts of tuberculosis index cases. METHODS: In 2002-06, we recruited contacts aged 15 years or older of index cases with pulmonary tuberculosis who lived in desert shanty towns in Ventanilla, Peru. We followed up contacts for tuberculosis until February, 2016. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to identify index case, contact, and household risk factors for tuberculosis from which to derive a score and classify contacts as low, medium, or high risk. We validated the score in an urban community recruited in Callao, Peru, in 2014-15. FINDINGS: In the derivation cohort, we identified 2017 contacts of 715 index cases, and median follow-up was 10.7 years (IQR 9.5-11.8). 178 (9%) of 2017 contacts developed tuberculosis during 19 147 person-years of follow-up (incidence 0.93 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 0.80-1.08). Risk factors for tuberculosis were body-mass index, previous tuberculosis, age, sustained exposure to the index case, the index case being in a male patient, lower community household socioeconomic position, indoor air pollution, previous tuberculosis among household members, and living in a household with a low number of windows per room. The 10-year risks of tuberculosis in the low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups were, respectively, 2.8% (95% CI 1.7-4.4), 6.2% (4.8-8.1), and 20.6% (17.3-24.4). The 535 (27%) contacts classified as high risk accounted for 60% of the tuberculosis identified during follow-up. The score predicted tuberculosis independently of tuberculin skin test and index-case drug sensitivity results. In the external validation cohort, 65 (3%) of 1910 contacts developed tuberculosis during 3771 person-years of follow-up (incidence 1.7 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 1.4-2.2). The 2.5-year risks of tuberculosis in the low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups were, respectively, 1.4% (95% CI 0.7-2.8), 3.9% (2.5-5.9), and 8.6%. (5.9-12.6). INTERPRETATION: Our externally validated risk score could predict and stratify 10-year risk of developing tuberculosis in adult contacts, and could be used to prioritise tuberculosis control interventions for people most likely to benefit. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, Department for International Development Civil Society Challenge Fund, Joint Global Health Trials consortium, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Imperial College National Institutes of Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, Sir Halley Stewart Trust, WHO, TB REACH, and Innovation for Health and Development.
Address Section of Infectious Diseases and Immunity, Imperial College London, London, UK; Wellcome Trust Imperial College Centre for Global Health Research, London, UK; Innovation for Health and Development (IFHAD), Laboratory of Research and Development, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; Innovacion Por la Salud Y Desarrollo (IPSYD), Asociacion Benefica PRISMA, Lima, Peru
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1473-3099 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28827142 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97505
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Author Harling, G.; Lima Neto, A.S.; Sousa, G.S.; Machado, M.M.T.; Castro, M.C.
Title Determinants of tuberculosis transmission and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza, Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume (up) 17 Issue 1 Pages 508
Keywords Brazil; Epidemiology; Fortaleza; Social determinants; Spatial analysis; Treatment; Treatment failure; Tuberculosis
Abstract BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem, despite recent achievements in reducing incidence and mortality rates. In Brazil, these achievements were above the worldwide average, but marked by large regional heterogeneities. In Fortaleza (5th largest city in Brazil), the tuberculosis cure rate has been declining and treatment abandonment has been increasing in the past decade, despite a reduction in incidence and an increase in directly observed therapy (DOT). These trends put efforts to eliminate tuberculosis at risk. We therefore sought to determine social and programmatic determinants of tuberculosis incidence and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza. METHODS: We analyzed sociodemographic and clinical data for all new tuberculosis cases notified in the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) from Fortaleza between 2007 and 2014. We calculated incidence rates for 117 neighborhoods in Fortaleza, assessed their spatial clustering, and used spatial regression models to quantify associations between neighborhood-level covariates and incidence rates. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to evaluate how individual- and neighborhood-level covariates predicted tuberculosis treatment abandonment. RESULTS: There were 12,338 new cases reported during the study period. Case rates across neighborhoods were significantly positively clustered in two low-income areas close to the city center. In an adjusted model, tuberculosis rates were significantly higher in neighborhoods with lower literacy, higher sewerage access and homicide rates, and a greater proportion of self-reported black residents. Treatment was abandoned in 1901 cases (15.4%), a rate that rose by 71% between 2007 and 2014. Abandonment was significantly associated with many individual sociodemographic and clinical factors. Notably, being recommended for DOT was protective for those who completed DOT, but associated with abandonment for those who did not. CONCLUSION: Low socioeconomic status areas have higher tuberculosis rates, and low socioeconomic individuals have higher risk of treatment abandonment, in Fortaleza. Treatment abandonment rates are growing despite the advent of universal DOT recommendations in Brazil. Proactive social policies, and active contact tracing to find missed cases, may help reduce the tuberculosis burden in this setting.
Address Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Building I, Room 1113, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. mcastro@hsph.harvard.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28545423 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97635
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Author Coll, C. de V.N.; Domingues, M.R.; Hallal, P.C.; da Silva, I.C.M.; Bassani, D.G.; Matijasevich, A.; Barros, A.; Santos, I.S.; Bertoldi, A.D.
Title Changes in leisure-time physical activity among Brazilian pregnant women: comparison between two birth cohort studies (2004 – 2015) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume (up) 17 Issue 1 Pages 119
Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Brazil; Cohort Studies; *Exercise; Female; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Maternal Age; Mothers/*statistics & numerical data; Obesity/complications; Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications/etiology/*prevention & control; Pregnancy Trimesters/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult; Birth cohort studies; Exercise; Motor activity; Physical activity; Pregnancy; Recommendations; Surveillance
Abstract BACKGROUND: Low levels of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) during pregnancy have been shown in studies conducted worldwide. Surveillance is extremely important to monitor the progress of physical activity patterns over time and set goals for effective interventions to decrease inactivity among pregnant women. The aim of this study was to evaluate time changes in LTPA among Brazilian pregnant women in an 11-year period (2004-2015) by comparing data from two birth cohort studies. METHODS: Two population-based birth cohort studies were carried out in the city of Pelotas, southern Brazil, in 2004 and 2015. A total of 4244 and 4271 mothers were interviewed after delivery. Weekly frequency and duration of each session of LTPA in a typical week were reported for the pre-pregnancy period and for each trimester of pregnancy. Trends in both recommended LTPA (>/=150 min/week) and any LTPA (regardless of weekly amount) were analysed overtime. Changes were also calculated separately for subgroups of maternal age, schooling, family income, parity, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pre-pregnancy LTPA. RESULTS: The proportion of women engaged in recommended levels of LTPA pre-pregnancy increased from 11.2% (95%CI 10.0-12.2) in 2004 to 15.8% (95%CI 14.6-16.9) in 2015. During pregnancy, no changes were observed over the period for the first (10.6 to 10.9%) and second (8.7 to 7.9%) trimesters, whereas there was a decrease from 3.4% (95%CI 2.9-4.0) to 2.4% (95%CI 1.9-2.8) in the last trimester. Major decreases in LTPA in the last trimester were observed among women who were younger, with intermediate to high income, high schooling, primiparous, pre-pregnancy obese and, engaged in LTPA before pregnancy. Changes in any LTPA practice followed the same patterns described for recommended LTPA. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the increase in the proportion of women engaged in LTPA before pregnancy between 2004 and 2005, LTPA levels remained stable during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and declined during the third gestational trimester over the period. Interventions to encourage the maintenance of LTPA practice throughout pregnancy are urgently needed.
Address Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28122524 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98029
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A.
Title Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis
Volume (up) 17 Issue 1 Pages 82
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.
Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99123
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meng, X.; Liu, S.; Duan, J.; Huang, X.; Zhou, P.; Xiong, X.; Gong, R.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Fu, C.; Li, C.; Wu, A.
Title Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal BMC Infect Dis
Volume (up) 17 Issue 1 Pages 82
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics/therapeutic use; Anti-Infective Agents; *Carbapenems; Case-Control Studies; Catheterization, Central Venous/statistics & numerical data; Child; Child, Preschool; China/epidemiology; Cross Infection/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Drug Costs; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy/economics/*epidemiology/microbiology; Female; Health Care Costs; Hemoglobins; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Hyperglycemia/epidemiology; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Tertiary Care Centers; Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data; Urologic Diseases/epidemiology; Young Adult; Crec; Csec; Healthcare-associated infection; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. RESULTS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (<6 months) (OR:3.96; 95%CI:1.26-12.42), tracheostomy (OR:2.24; 95%CI: 1.14-4.38), central venous catheter insertion (OR: 8.15; 95%CI: 2.31-28.72), carbapenem exposure (OR: 12.02; 95%CI: 1.52-95.4), urinary system disease (OR: 16.69; 95%CI: 3.01-89.76), low hemoglobin (OR: 2.83; 95%CI: 1.46-5.50), and high blood glucose are associated (OR: 7.01; 95%CI: 1.89-26.02) with CREC infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.
Address Infection Control Centre, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. xywuanhua@csu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2334 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28095785 Approved no
Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 100153
Permanent link to this record