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Author Gerceker, G.O.; Yardimci, F.; Aydinok, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized controlled trial of care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients Type Randomized Controlled Trial
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Oncology Nursing : the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society Abbreviated Journal Eur J Oncol Nurs  
  Volume (up) 28 Issue Pages 14-20  
  Keywords Adolescent; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Bacteremia/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; *Bandages; Catheter-Related Infections/*drug therapy/*prevention & control; Catheterization, Central Venous/methods; Central Venous Catheters/microbiology; Child; Child, Preschool; Chlorhexidine/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Patient Care Bundles; Prospective Studies; Turkey  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the care bundles including chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings on the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in pediatric hematology-oncology patients with central venous catheters (CVCs). METHOD: Twenty-seven PHO patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study in Turkey. The researcher used care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing in the experimental group (n = 14), and care bundles with advanced dressings in the control group (n = 13). RESULTS: According to the study results, 28.6% of the patients in the experimental group had CRBSI, while this rate was 38.5% in the control group patients. The CRBSI rate in the experimental group was 3.9, and the control group had 4.4 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. There was no exit-site infection in the experimental group. However, the control group had 1.7 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. CONCLUSIONS: Even though there was no difference between the two groups in which the researcher implemented care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings in terms of CRBSI development, there was reduction in the CRBSI rates thanks to the care bundle approach. It is possible to control the CRBSI rates using care bundles in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.  
  Address Ege University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Hematology-Oncology, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address: yesim.aydinok@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-3889 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28478850 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 99881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nourallah, B.; Digpal, R.; Jena, R.; Watts, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Irradiating the Subventricular Zone in Glioblastoma Patients: Is there a Case for a Clinical Trial? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Clinical Oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)) Abbreviated Journal Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)  
  Volume (up) 29 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Adult; Brain Neoplasms/*radiotherapy; Glioblastoma/*radiotherapy; Humans; Lateral Ventricles/*radiation effects; Male; Neoplastic Stem Cells/radiation effects; Stem Cell Niche/radiation effects; Cancer stem cells; glioblastoma; neural stem cells; radiotherapy; subventricular zone  
  Abstract Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive adult brain tumour. Over the last 10 years it has emerged that the subventricular zone (SVZ), the largest adult neural stem cell niche, has an important role in the disease. Converging evidence has implicated transformation of adult neural stems in gliomagenesis and the permissive stem cell niche in disease recurrence. Concurrently, clinical studies have suggested that SVZ involvement is a negative prognostic marker. It would follow that irradiating the SVZ may improve outcomes in glioblastoma by directly targeting this putative sanctuary site. To investigate this potential strategy, 11 retrospective studies and 1 prospective study examined the relationship between dose to the SVZ and survival outcomes in glioblastoma patients. This review summarises the theoretical underpinning of this strategy, provides a critical evaluation of the existing evidence and discusses the rationale for a clinical trial.  
  Address John van Geest Centre for Repair, Cambridge, UK; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Division of Neurosurgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: cw209@cam.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0936-6555 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27729188 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96633  
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Author Luedi, M.M.; Singh, S.K.; Mosley, J.C.; Hatami, M.; Gumin, J.; Sulman, E.P.; Lang, F.F.; Stueber, F.; Zinn, P.O.; Colen, R.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Dexamethasone-regulated Gene Signature Is Prognostic for Poor Survival in Glioblastoma Patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology Abbreviated Journal J Neurosurg Anesthesiol  
  Volume (up) 29 Issue 1 Pages 46-58  
  Keywords Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/*pharmacology; Apoptosis; Blotting, Western; Brain Neoplasms/*mortality; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Survival; Dexamethasone/*pharmacology; Flow Cytometry; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/*drug effects; Glioblastoma/*mortality; Humans; Mice; Prognosis; Stem Cells/drug effects; Survival Analysis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone is reported to induce both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effects. The purpose of this study was to identify the genomic impact of dexamethasone in glioblastoma stem cell (GSC) lines and its prognostic value; furthermore, to identify drugs that can counter these side effects of dexamethasone exposure. METHODS: We utilized 3 independent GSC lines with tumorigenic potential for this study. Whole-genome expression profiling and pathway analyses were done with dexamethasone-exposed and control cells. GSCs were also co-exposed to dexamethasone and temozolomide. Risk scores were calculated for most affected genes, and their associations with survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas and Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data databases. In silico Connectivity Map analysis identified camptothecin as antagonist to dexamethasone-induced negative effects. RESULTS: Pathway analyses predicted an activation of dexamethasone network (z-score: 2.908). Top activated canonical pathways included “role of breast cancer 1 in DNA damage response” (P=1.07E-04). GSCs were protected against temozolomide-induced apoptosis when coincubated with dexamethasone. Altered cellular functions included cell movement, cell survival, and apoptosis with z-scores of 2.815, 5.137, and -3.122, respectively. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB) was activated in a dose dependent manner specifically in slow-dividing “stem-like” cells. CEBPB was activated in dexamethasone-treated orthotopic tumors. Patients with high risk scores had significantly shorter survival. Camptothecin was validated as potential partial neutralizer of dexamethasone-induced oncogenic effects. CONCLUSIONS: Dexamethasone exposure induces a genetic program and CEBPB expression in GSCs that adversely affects key cellular functions and response to therapeutics. High risk scores associated with these genes have negative prognostic value in patients. Our findings further suggest camptothecin as a potential neutralizer of adverse dexamethasone-mediated effects.  
  Address *Department of Anesthesiology, Bern University Hospital Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland Departments of daggerCancer Systems Imaging double daggerDiagnostic Imaging section signNeurosurgery and Brain Tumor Center parallelRadiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology #Neurosurgery, Cancer Systems Imaging, and Cancer Biology **Cancer Systems Imaging, and Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center paragraph signDepartment of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0898-4921 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27653222 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 96635  
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Author Goetz, L.G.; Valeggia, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Human Biology : the Official Journal of the Human Biology Council Abbreviated Journal Am J Hum Biol  
  Volume (up) 29 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. METHODS: We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. RESULTS: The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet.  
  Address Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 05611  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1042-0533 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28101997 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 98030  
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Author Moimaz, S.A.S.; Rocha, N.B.; Garbin, C.A.S.; Rovida, T.A.; Saliba, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors affecting intention to breastfeed of a group of Brazilian childbearing women Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives Abbreviated Journal Women Birth  
  Volume (up) 30 Issue 2 Pages e119-e124  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Brazil; Breast Feeding/*psychology; Female; Humans; Mothers/*psychology; Pregnancy; Retrospective Studies; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult; Brazil; Breastfeeding; Breastfeeding difficulties; Breastfeeding initiation; Pregnancy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Knowing the intention of mothers is important to plan actions to improve exclusive breastfeeding rates. AIM: The objective of this retrospective study was to verify the intention to breastfeed and the intended breastfeeding duration of a group of women participating in a public prenatal dental care program in the city of Aracatuba, Brazil. METHODS: The records of 933 childbearing women were analyzed and their intention to breastfeed and intended breastfeeding duration were associated to women's age, ethnicity, marital status, education, employment, number of gestations, previous breastfeeding experience, previous breastfeeding guidance, presence of complications during pregnancy, and systemic diseases. Data were inserted into Epi Info 2000 and analyzed with Biostat, at a 5% level of significance, and confidence interval of 95%. FINDINGS: Participants mean age was 26.1+/-5.9years. The majority of women (96.5%) declared their intention to breastfeed their babies. The main variables to affect the intention to breastfeed were the number of gestations (p=0.001), previous breastfeeding experience (p=0.03), and previous breastfeeding guidance (p=0.01). Intended breastfeeding duration was significantly affected by women's age (p=0.04), employment (0.02), the number of gestations (p=0.001), and previous breastfeeding experience (p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Previous positive breastfeeding experience and guidance during prenatal examinations positively affected women's intention to breastfeed; while older, unemployed women in their second or more gestation and previous breastfeeding experience intended to breastfeed their children for longer periods of time.  
  Address Preventive and Social Dentistry Department, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Aracatuba, Brazil. Electronic address: nemre@foa.unesp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1871-5192 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27840072 Approved no  
  Call Number ref @ user @ Serial 97339  
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